NY lawmaker calls for ban on over-the-counter sports drug - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

NY lawmaker calls for ban on over-the-counter sports drug

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Jack 3D, GNC's XP Sport, and Oxy Lite Pro are marketed by GNC and Vitamin Shoppes stores as supplements that will enhance your workout. They all share one common ingredient: dimethyamylamine, better known as DMAA.

State Sen. Jeffrey Klein (D-Bronx) is pushing legislation that would make New York the first state to ban DMAA. He calls one of the most dangerous drugs on shelves.

"Students are being led to believe that these products will give them an edge over their competition. That's dead wrong," Klein said. "Not only are these products dangerous, but by using them, student athletes are one drug test away from ending their athletic careers."

Currently, products that contain it are under review by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has not ruled that DMAA is dangerous, but is concerned about how it is marketed.

DMAA has allegedly been linked to cardiac issues, psychiatric episodes, and even the deaths of some soldiers and Marines.

The NCAA, NFL, MLB, NBA, USTA, NASCAR, and International Olympic Committee guidelines all ban the substance, Klein said. But it is also ruining promising athletic careers because it is sold as a natural supplement that goes by many different names, and that is why athletes often don't know what they are putting in their bodies.

Tennis pro Robert Kendrick was banned from the U.S. Open for taking something his trainer said would help with jet lag. He tested positive for DMAA and retired from the sport.

The other issue Klein is concerned about is that stores selling it aren't seriously conveying its risks.

Undercover video given to Fox 5 by Klein's office shows a staffer buying the product. When asked about its side effects, the clerk answered there were none. When asked if it could do any harm, the employee joked that it killed 3 Marines but replied "just don't take 60 and you'll be okay."

The Vitamin Shoppe declined to comment.

GNC issued a statement: "GNC does not manufacture any private label products that include DMAA as an ingredient. The third party products we do sell that contain DMAA are widely available at other retailer outlets, including online.  The military has been reviewing DMAA for approximately 12 months and has yet to produce any scientific or medical evidence to support a safety concern."

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