Mother speaks after jury doesn’t indict officer in son's death - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

No indictment in traffic stop killing

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The mother and family of Army National Guardsman Noel Polanco spoke for the first time since a Queens grand jury decided not to indict the NYPD detective who shot and killed him during a traffic stop in October.

Cecilia Reyes keeps a photograph of her son, Noel Polanco, on a necklace close to her heart.  

"It's just hard – it's hard. No one can ever imagine the pain … it's hard,"  Reyes says.  "For his life to be taken away so quickly, it makes no sense." 

A grieving mother spoke publicly for the first time since a Queens grand jury decided not to pursue criminal charges against the NYPD officer who killed her son. 

"It's still murder to me, it's still murder." 

The Polanco family was receiving support and encouragement while appearing at Rev. AL Sharpton's National Action Network in Harlem.  

"It's wrong. The guy has his badge and gun. Go back to work with no reason – it's not fair," said Naomi Francisco, a friend of Polanco's. 

Detective Hassan Hamdy fired the fatal shot last October during a traffic stop on the Grand Central Parkway. Sources say the officer fired after he saw Polanco reaching under his seat for a weapon, a witness in the car said the unarmed Army Reservists' hands were on the steering wheel -- there was no gun in the car.  

Micheal Palladino of the Detectives Endowment Association saying earlier "I was optimistic there would not be an indictment because our detective never intended to commit a crime or take someone's life." 

Noel Polanco was a National Guardsman and aspiring policeman. Now that a grand jury decided not to indict the officer who killed him, his family says they want to file a civil suit in federal court.

"I don't feel like anyone should go through this. If I can get some kind of help – I won't give up," said Reyes. 

Detective Hassan Hamdy could still face departmental charges following an internal review.

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