Activists protest maker of genetically modified seeds - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Activists protest maker of genetically modified seeds

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TEMPE, Ariz. -

In 250 cities across the world on Saturday, people rallied to march against Monsanto, a seed producer based out of Minnesota.

The company says their genetically modified products help farmers make profits, while conserving resources.

But many people believe their seeds grow foods that is dangerous to our bodies.
    
Hundreds of people marched down University Drive Saturday morning to fight the maker of genetically modified seeds that they believe cause health and environmental problems.

"They're not even food, this fake food is unhealthy," said Jared Keen, who is against Monsanto.

Monsanto's seeds are engineered to resist insecticides and herbicides and help increase the global food supply, but these people say they're not safe to eat.

"I think that once we alter the genetic structure of food, I think our bodies don't know what to do with that food anymore so it does effect--I mean we have the unhealthiest population on the planet, yet we have more food than ever available, if you can call what people are eating food," said Stephanie Blackbird, who is against Monsanto.

The federal government and many scientists say GMO's are not harmful to our bodies, but people fighting Saturday at least want GMO's to be labeled.

"We put all kinds of labeling on our food products, we also put warning labels on cigarettes, we put labels on alcohol, but they don't want to put the label warning on their food. They don't want to tell people what's in their food, that should raise red flags for everybody; at least let people know what's in their food," said Keen.

"I think we should have a choice to know what's in our food and to buy it or not buy it and the next step is to not eat it at all, to make choices to not buy that food," said Blackbird.

Earlier this week the Senate rejected a bill allowing states to require labeling of genetically modified foods.

A statement, in part, from Monsanto reads:
"While we respect each individual's right to express their point of view on these topics, we believe we are making a contribution to improving agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving natural resources such as water and energy."

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