Digital diaper to track baby’s health - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Digital diaper to track baby’s health

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

A so-called "smart diaper" claims to help monitor your baby's health.

It's called the Smart Diaper, its digital and conceived and designed to track a baby's health.

The diapers have patches in front with colored squares. The squares change when reacting to different compounds found in baby urine like water content, protein and bacteria.

Compounds that can be used to identify health issues such as urinary tract infections, proper hydration and kidney disease. It was created by one New York couple Yaroslav Faybishenko and his wife Jennie. Fox 5 spoke to the couple by phone.

"We could use special engineered diapers and require data before the visible symptoms set in and to try to understand the onset of any chronic conditions before simply before the symptoms are visible," said Yaroslav Faybishenko, inventor of "Smart Diaper."

The diaper comes with a smartphone app that will scan the patch then send that information to a doctor.

Dori Anchin is a pediatrician with Children's and Women's Physicians of Westchester. She worries that urine tests aren't the proper way to screen for what the smart diaper promises to identify.

"Dehydration, again what they're marketing this product towards the best way to assess for that is clinically in your office, taking a history and doing a physical examination on the patient and for urinary tract infection," said Dr. Dori Anchin, pediatrician. "Again, there are many false positives and many false negatives. It's not a good way to screen for UTI."

The diaper has yet to get FDA approval but its makers believe it will be a game changer. However, some parents Fox 5 spoke to worry it will instead lead to lazy parenting.  

"When it comes to the health of my baby, I go on instinct and I call the doctor," said one father.

"I don't know, they seem a little hi-tech for me," said one mother.

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