Xbox One and PlayStation 4 face off for holiday dollars - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Xbox One and PlayStation 4 face off for holiday dollars

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Remember when Super Mario mesmerized and Sonic scorched the Sega Genesis screen? That was then, this is now: Microsoft Xbox One and Sony PlayStation 4.

Xbox One is priced at $500. PS4 will cost about $400. Two systems are promising to revolutionize the gaming industry, again. So now the great debate: Which one should you get?

Sherri Smith of Laptop Magazine says Xbox One is advertised to be the centerpiece of your living room. Among the many features is the HDMI pass-through that allows you to watch TV through the console while you control things by voice command.

Like the Xbox, the PS4 has 8 gigs of RAM and a Blu-ray player. It will also have plenty of features allowing users to share their gaming experience with their friends and other users.

Nearly 60 percent of all adults still play video games, according to the Entertainment Software Association. The industry generates about $20 billion a year. This year, the numbers could be even higher. With the upcoming release of the PS4 and Xbox one, stores like Best Buy have seen pre-order sales at a near record pace.

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