Rainbow Loom: hottest toy in America - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Rainbow Loom: hottest toy in America

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Not since the fairy-tale of Rumpelstiltskin has a loom resonated so strongly with children. But instead of spinning straw into gold the Rainbow Loom turns rubber bands into friendship, or at least friendship bracelets.

The Rainbow Loom hearkens back to the days of Silly-Bandz, slap bracelets and lanyards. But after a summer of sleep-away camp and time to kill, kids purchased the loom's one-millionth starter kit in early August, making it the hottest toy in America.

The concept's relatively simple: A $17 starter kit gets you plastic pegs and 600 rubber bands to weave into bracelets. But young weavers didn't stop there. Not satisfied with basic patterns, kids invented their own and shared their new designs on YouTube.

Videos hosted by grade-schoolers demonstrate weaves with names like "zigzag," "butterfly-blossom," and "raindrop." The videos receive tens of thousands of views each.

The product markets itself to young girls, but sellers say it attracts both genders, ages 5 to 18 and older.

Ranges of possible color-schemes, charms, and weaves create a ton of potential for expansion sets and knockoffs.

But for now the Rainbow Loom stands alone in the arena of elastic-friendship-jewelry, reclaiming the word "loom" for a younger generation.

http://www.rainbowloom.com/

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