Discounted back-to-school fashions - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Discounted back-to-school fashions

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

When it comes to back-to-school shopping teens are moving away from expensive labels and ending up in places like Forever 21, Top Shop and H&M.

"Labels don't matter as long as you have the look," said Laurel Pantin, market editor Lucky magazine.

You have heard of fast food now young people are craving fast fashion. In fact you may be able to get your entire back to school look for less than a burger, and still be hip.

"The girls at Lucky also we are obsessed with shopping at places like Zara, H&M, Topshop, ASOS, and Forever 21," Pantin said. "They are great places to go and find trends that you don't want to spend a ton of money on but you do want to try out. The kids are looking there and seeing what they want to be rocking. It's a way to dip your toe in the trend."

Pricier stores like Abercrombie and Fitch, Aeropostale and American Eagle were once the go-to for school threads. On Wednesday American Eagle reportedly gave a weak forecast for fall, and Aeropostale said comparable sales were off 15 percent last quarter.

Parents are noticing the price difference.

We caught up with a mother and daughter duo on the way out of H&M where they had just bought $12 jeans. They said they got a few outfits and shoes for $90.

Shoppers told us they like that nice designers are making clothes for H&M and other stores, so why pay a lot?

But some say not everything in Topshop looks top quality.

"Some of the clothes are cheap looking," a shopper said. "You have to dig through the racks and see."

But most say the clothes aren't quite disposable. Consumers say the clothes last a few years, but fashions change, anyway.

Young people in the U.S. account for an estimated $300 billion in spending in annually. Teens love to shop. Now they may be getting more practical about it.

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