Always late? You may perceive time differently - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Always late? You may perceive time differently

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

You hear us, late people? Buy a watch! Set an alarm! Show the world some respect! Here is a sampling of what folks have to say to the chronologically challenged:

  • "If you're trying to be there on time, get up early."
  • "Be prompt."
  • "And if you're not going to be, text people ahead of time not after you're supposed to be there."
  • "Don't do it. It's aggravating and disrespectful and rude."

But now just when we're feeling really good about ripping that schedule-bungler who doesn't give a flying clock about making us wait, science shows up and tells us it's possible our tardy friends can't help it.

"Very often it's somebody who's just really self-involved," said Dr. Robi Ludwig. "It may not be in a mean way. It's just in a non-thinking kind of way."

Ludwig said some chronically late people actually perceive time differently than the rest of us.

"Many times it's just somebody not understanding what it takes to get from one place to another," she said.

So when you check your watch, realize you need to hustle and then pull a hammy getting to work on time. A coworker on the same schedule may glance down and say: 'Oh, I've got time to grab a coffee.'

"I don't know why someone in the past would've been more timely than currently," Ludwig said.

So no, when they were our age our forefathers weren't actually late if they weren't five minutes early.

Over-bookers, the easily distracted, and those armed with a different excuse for every tardy minute have tormented humans forever. That means they may never face our scoldings because they haven't arrived yet.

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