Police release an interactive NYC crime map - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Police release an interactive NYC crime map

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) - The NYPD and NYC's Information Technology and Telecommunications Department have created a new online map that lets the public see where crimes have occurred.

It bears some similarities to the well known Compstat system in the 1990s adopted by soon-to-be Police Commissioner Bill Bratton that helped pin point high-crime areas needing a stronger police presence.

The map shows major felony crimes, including, murder, robbery, rape, various property crimes including burglary and more.

People can search by ZIP code, address or police precinct.

See the system online: http://maps.nyc.gov/crime

Police Commissioner Ray Kelly says the map will help New Yorkers and researchers understand where major crimes are constantly happening.

The map fulfilled a law passed by the City Council in the spring that required the NYPD to make crime statistics public.  
The new system bears a passing resemblance to the more famous Compstat system that was started by Jack Maple when he was a Transit police officer. It was called 'Charts of the Future' and at the time it was very simple. It tracked crime through pins stuck in maps.

Charts of the Future is credited with cutting subway crime by 27 percent.

Bill Bratton, who was Chief of Transit Police at the time, was later appointed Police Commissioner by Rudolph Giuliani, and brought Maple's Charts of the Future with him. He made the NYPD adopt it after it was re-branded as CompStat, and it has since been credited with bringing down crime by more than 70%.

In 1995, exactly one year after CompStat was adopted, murders dropped down to 1,181 from previous highs of over 2,000 murders a year.

By 2003, there were 596 murders, the lowest number since 1964. 

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