Starbucks baristas' creative spelling of patrons' names - Dallas News | myFOXdfw.com

Starbucks baristas' creative spelling of patrons' names

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Starbucks is usually on point when it comes to getting your coffee exactly the way you like it. But when it comes to employees spelling your name correctly on your cup, it's a different story.

"My name's Casey, so they misspell it all the time," Casey Shimon said. "I've gotten Ks. My favorite was K-a-e-s-i. I was like have you ever even seen that before?"

"My name is Jared, j-a-r-e-d, and I get Jerry," Jared Barnett said. "So when I go there now I just say Jerry."

Simple spellings can sometimes go very wrong, especially at Starbucks.

"I was here earlier on in the week. My name is Madison and they wrote Max on the cup," Madison said.

"I have a friend named Kat. She always gets Pat or like Kart, which isn't even a name," said another patron.

Your venti no-whip caramel macchiato or tall skinny vanilla soy misto may be perfection. But the way the baristas spell your name on the cup can sometimes be far from it.

"My name is Illy, and I get Elly, Lilly, Ilana, Leona," Illy said.

"My name is Ryan, and they always put Bryan with a B. Bryan," Ryan Cox said.

"It's funny because then you have the card. They should know what your name is because all your information is on the card," Reggie said.

The misspellings are causing a stir on social media, with funny misspellings showing up on Facebook and Instagram. There's even a whole Tumblr page dedicated to it. Check out some of these: an interesting take on Erin, spelled Air Inn. And what about Michelle spelled Missle. And on this cup, well the barista just gave up: "I am going to spell your name wrong."

"Half the time they're just making up the spellings. I think they do it for fun in the back or something," one patron said.

We reached out to Starbucks to see whether they had any comment about these misspellings and all the attention they're getting on social media. The company released a statement which reads in part: "One of the ways we get to know our customers is by learning their names so our employees can connect with them each time they visit the store. When we fail to meet our customers' expectations, we always apologize and work to make it right."

But hey, they sometimes do get it right. Well, almost!

"I can't tell if that's a C or a K. It's Carrie. Pretty close," Carrie said.

By the way, of the many people we interviewed no one had their spelled correctly. But as long as the coffee is good, that's all that really matters.

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