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Twins hold hands after birth

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) - It's sometimes said that twins hold a special bond, and for a set born last week in Ohio, they might have come out of the womb showing it.

The twin girls started holding hands as soon as they were born. They are considered monoamniotic or 'mono mono' twins because they had shared an amniotic sac and placenta. That happens in about one in 10,000 twin pregnancies.

When twins share an amniotic sac, there are many risks. The twins’ umbilical cords can become entangled and one fetus’ cord might wrap around the other one’s neck.

"They were born 45 seconds apart," said Amy Kilgore, a hospital spokesperson who was there for the birth. "Once they made sure they were OK, they held them up so mom and dad could see. As soon as they were side by side, they held hands. It gave me chills."

The girls, named Jenna and Jillian, were born Friday to Sarah and Bill Thistlethwaite, of Orville, at Akron General Medical Center.  Kilgore said the babies were safely delivered at 33 weeks, weighing almost five pounds each.

"To hear them both crying, that's what you want, and you're holding your breath," said Kilgore.

Sarah Thistlethwaite is also doing well and recovering from the surgery.

Because Jenna and Jillian are premature, they were taken directly to the Special Care Nursery, a neonatal intensive care unit operated by Akron Children’s Hospital. They could spend up to a month there before heading home to join their 15-month-old brother Jaxson.

Kilgore says the hospital is actually expecting another set of mono mono twins this week.

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